Discussion forum on Fresco painting technique and workshop, visual and performing arts, gallery and museum exhibitions, advice on art marketing from professional art agent, fresco documentary, artist promotion,
 


TrueFresco.com | Technique | Image Gallery | Fresco School | Art Commissions | Art Gazette | Art Events | Shop


Dear guest! You must login to see/use new forum features. If you are a new user, please register.


Subject: "Verdaccio - definition"     Previous Topic | Next Topic
Printer-friendly copy     Email this topic to a friend    
Conferences Fresco Painting Fresco Painting (original forum) Topic #260
Reading Topic #260
adminadmin click here to view user rating
Charter Member
286 posts, 4 feedbacks, 6 points
01-Jul-08, 12:51 PM (PST)
Click to EMail admin Click to send private message to admin Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list Click to visit 's homepage  
"Verdaccio - definition"
 
Verdaccio is an Italian name for the mixture of mars black and yellow ochre resulting in a grayish or yellowish (depending on the proportion) soft green.

Verdaccio became integral part of fresco painting where this color is used for defining tonal values, creating complete monochromatic underpainting. Often architectural details in frescoes are left in Verdacchio without any additional color layers, best example is the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, where you can clearly see verdaccio underpainting left as is on all architectural details of the composition.

The technique of underpainting in verdaccio became known as Verdaccio.

In oil painting a similar technique is used by flemish painters which is referred to as the "Dead Layer". "Dead Layer" is applied over the traditional burnt umber underpainting to refine the values and remove the warm tone of umber. The resulted "white to olive green to black" underpainting is like "like being lit by a moon light" which does not affect the tonality of the final painting.

learn fresco at http://FrescoSchool.org

fresco painting video tutorials: http://www.FrescoSchool.com

also visit

Fresco School Video Channel
http://youtube.com/FrescoSchool

Contemporary Fresco Gazette
http://trueFresco.Org
commission fresco or mural http://iLAdesigns.com

admin
____________________________
Contemporary Fresco Painting Resouce Center
http://TrueFresco.com


  Alert | IP User Menu | Scratch Pad | Printer-friendly page | Edit | Reply | Reply With Quote | Top
sasadangelo
Member since 10-Aug-11
2 posts, Rate this user
10-Aug-11, 01:47 AM (PST)
Click to EMail sasadangelo Click to send private message to sasadangelo Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list Click to visit 's homepage  
1. "RE: Verdaccio - definition"
In response to message #0
 
   Hi all,
I did some research about verdaccio color. Here what I discovered.

In 1200 painting was not so diffuse in Florence and governor of city called some Greek painters to decorate some churches (see Vasari book). There started to work Cimabue that learned to use verdaccio as an underpanting of flesh color.

Before apply verdaccio he did a line drawing and traced some dark area with terra verte (earth green) then on top of it applied the verdaccio.

Cimabue taught the process to Giotto. Giotto taught the process to Taddeo Gaddi that was his pupil for 24 years. Taddeo taught it to his son Agnolo. Agnolo taught it to Cennino Cennini that reported the process in his Craftsman's Handbook.
http://www.noteaccess.com/Texts/Cennini/

No green pigment was used. Only black, yellow ochre, white and red. White in the english text is called white lime but actual Italian name was "Bianco San Giovanni" literally can be translated in "White Saint John" but I do not think it exists any more. Yellow Ochre was available at that time in two versions: dark and light. Cennini wrote to prefer dark if possible. The red was Cinabrese. So no green was present in the mixture.

Also the recipes provided by Wikipedia seems wrong because it does not cite the red.

So I think your recipes is pretty good because you cited yellow ochre and blank. White was used for light area. You missed red probably used to neutralize the green color and make it more gray.

I wrote an article on this here.
http://www.drawandpaint.net/verdaccio-underpainting/

Let me know what do you think about my research.
Thank you

Salvatore
http://www.drawandpaint.net


  Alert | IP User Menu | Scratch Pad | Printer-friendly page | Edit | Reply | Reply With Quote | Top
sasadangelo
Member since 10-Aug-11
2 posts, Rate this user
10-Aug-11, 01:51 AM (PST)
Click to EMail sasadangelo Click to send private message to sasadangelo Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list Click to visit 's homepage  
2. "RE: Verdaccio - definition"
In response to message #0
 
   Hi all,
In 1200 painting was not so diffuse in Florence and governor of city called some Greek painters to decorate some churches (see Vasari). There started to work Cimabue that learned to use verdaccio as an underpanting of flesh color.
Before apply verdaccio it did a line drawing and traced some dark area with terra verte (earth green) then on top
of it applied the verdaccio.

Cimabue taught the process to Giotto. Giotto taught the process to Taddeo Gaddi that was his pupil for 24 years.
Taddeo taught it to his son Agnolo. Agnolo taught it to Cennino Cennini that reported the process in his
Craftsman's Handbook.
http://www.noteaccess.com/Texts/Cennini/

No green pigment was used. Only black, yellow ochre, white and red. White in the english text is called white lime
but actual italian name was "Bianco San Giovanni" literally translated "White Saint John" but I do not think it exists any more. Yellow Ocrhe was available at that time in two versions: dark and light. Cennini wrote to prefer dark if possible. The red was cinabrese. So no green is present in the mixture. Also the recipes provided by
Wikipedia seems wrong because it does not cite the red.

I wrote an article on this here.
http://www.drawandpaint.net/verdaccio-underpainting/
Thank you

Salvatore
http://www.drawandpaint.net


  Alert | IP User Menu | Scratch Pad | Printer-friendly page | Edit | Reply | Reply With Quote | Top
mozart
Member since 25-Nov-01
6 posts, Rate this user
25-Aug-11, 01:38 PM (PST)
Click to EMail mozart Click to send private message to mozart Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
3. "RE: Verdaccio - definition"
In response to message #2
 
   Good examples of frescoes from the early middle ages where preliminary painting may be observed is in Pisa. Here there is a the presents many sinopi or sinopia. (forgive my spelling)These early frescoes used a pigment that came from Asia Minor, modern say Syria. It is known for its deep, earthy red. Most of the paintings on the arriccio are done using this pigment. It was also (I believe a high iron or ferric oxide content)to make hard conte-like crayons used in so many Renaissance drawings.

The terra verde would be the most prominent color used in the earliest stages of painting a figure on boun fresco. With time constraints on working on the final layer or velo, the artist would work quickly to establish middle values, using the terre verde. A brush loaded mostly with pigment would be connect transferred outlines and essential form lines; the heavier pigment would look almost black. Mars black could have been used to add as a tint, but rarely as a sole pigment. Layers of terre verde can get pretty dark. For the lighter areas of flesh tone or areas illuminated by light, the lime surface would act as your white, similar as in water color. A diluted amount of paint acts more like a wash and transitions nicely from areas of middle value.

Fresco artists from the middle ages and Renaissance handle the outlines of figures two ways. Some hide or blend the lines carefully with the figure, while other display it pronounced and use it to define shadow and to create a more sculptured form.

The best example of Verdaccio applied in oil painting I feel can be seen Leonardo's unfinished nativity in the Uffizi Museum. To find one recipe for a pigment or standard practices in developing flesh tone in figures will fall into a variety of artists' preferences. The palette of colors for a scene often determine what is used underneath. Is it going to be a dramatic illumination of figures by a light source at night where many reds, yellows, and near dark pigments are used or a scene with ample light where dark, middle, and light values on the skin will be modeled?

trazom34@hotmail.com


  Alert | IP User Menu | Scratch Pad | Printer-friendly page | Edit | Reply | Reply With Quote | Top
adminadmin click here to view user rating
Charter Member
286 posts, 4 feedbacks, 6 points
13-Sep-11, 07:40 AM (PST)
Click to EMail admin Click to send private message to admin Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list Click to visit 's homepage  
4. "RE: Verdaccio - definition"
In response to message #2
 

>Wikipedia seems wrong because it does not cite
>the red.

red is optional, so as white

learn fresco at http://FrescoSchool.org

fresco painting video tutorials: http://www.FrescoSchool.com

also visit

Fresco School Video Channel
http://youtube.com/FrescoSchool

Contemporary Fresco Gazette
http://trueFresco.Org
commission fresco or mural http://iLAdesigns.com

admin
____________________________
Contemporary Fresco Painting Resouce Center
http://TrueFresco.com


  Alert | IP User Menu | Scratch Pad | Printer-friendly page | Edit | Reply | Reply With Quote | Top

Conferences | Forums | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Rate this topicRate this topic

Take Advantage of the Free Shipping!




Cafe al Fresco Entrance Hall - first stop for a "newbe" or browse while "your dinner at our Cafe is being served". Annoincements, Educational resources, feedback, polls. Also includes popular "Bar Stool... Just Art!" Forum. Contemporary Fresco Painting Resource Center discussions. Fresco Technique, Modern & Classic Fresco History, Workshop, Tutorials and comments. Includes Murals & Trompe L'oeil, Architecture & Design topics and "Kids Corner". Fresco Workshop Students (members only) Forum also found here. Voice your opinion on Art and Culture in general or discuss a particular artwork. What is your take on the Art for the Future? Create your own gallery or contribute to our Group Exhibitions. Get your own work reviewed or review other members art. Theatre and else... Music, Cinematograph, Writers Table, The Poets Club, Comedy Central, etc. Support Forums for the TrueFresco.com Art World Community - Free web sites provided by TrueFresco.com Nightlife, Internet, Travel & Leasure and miscellanies topics. Get all of the current posts in a glance!








ART  COMMUNITY CHANNEL  GUIDE

WELCOME Channel

.
News, media headlines, articles, pictures, art promotion, reviews, art critique, reviews, fine and decorative arts resources, discussions, debates, art event calendars, art clubs - all things art organized in content channels by topics of interest.
.

Dynamic, on-the-fly, automated content updates - post your image in our FPAA&ID Image Database/Gallery or post your Article in the Cafe al Fresco Forums and see it distributed throughout our Content Channels. As well as World Media News feeds specific to each channel.

         

FRESCO PAINTING Channel

         

MURAL, TROMPE & FAUX Channel

         

SCULPTURE Channel

         

ART CRITIQUE Channel

         

ART DEBATES Channel

         

ART MARKETING Channel