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Subject: "How to Make Lime Putty"     Previous Topic | Next Topic
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Gary sculptari click here to view user rating
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14-Apr-01, 04:31 PM (PST)
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"How to Make Lime Putty"
 
   I am just relaxing after mixing 400 lbs of lime putty. I have chosen to use high calcite lime, type "N", from the Chemical Lime kiln here in Vancouver. They are using a limestone deposit from Texada Island which is very pure - the magnesium is less than one percent. The magnesium should be no more than 5 to 10% for fresco. There are high calcite klins all over North America. The price is $6 for a 55lb bag here.

There are three ways to mix the lime. The first is "manually" using a box similar to a big wheelbarrow, and a hoe. The lime must be sieved into the water already in the tank, 14 quarts per 50 lbs of lime. This is similar to when you add plaster to water. The next day the putty has to be seived through a fine mesh wire screen to catch any small lumps. The next way, which I am using, is to get one of those 55 gallon plastic drums, cut the top off, and use this as your mixing and storage container. The second technique adds the lime to water but then you mix it with a 3/4" drill, at least nine amps, and a large "jiffy" mixer - ask at a concrete supply store. These drills are expensive to buy new $600 - $700 in Canada, and the paddle is about $75. (Of course true to my style, I bought a used drill made in 1945 from the pawnshop for $175, cleaned it up, changed the plug/wire, and it should last another 50 years;-) )In this technique, you will not have to seive the lime before or after mixing - but the mixing is very hard physical work. It took me about two hours to mix 400 lbs. to a nice creamy putty with no lumps. I will use the same technique and drill to make my intonaco mortar, mixing the lime putty with white marble sand. I also use the drill to mix concrete for my panels. The third way is to rent a proper mortar/plaster mixer from the rental yard, at a cost of $55 to $75 a day. This is a big paddle mixer, vertical or horizontal, gas or electric - make sure you understand that this is not a "cement" mixer - our stuff is too stiff for that. It can handle a minimum of three cubic yards a load, so that is a lot of lime putty. Measure out the water into the mixer, add the lime and mix it for about five minutes, tip it out into the barrels/pails, clean up the machine - it really is that simple. They cost over $2000 to buy. If you have a group of artists, you could collaborate to make a batch of putty and intonaco mortar all in one day.

So - I do not sell lime putty at this time, it costs me too much sweat to make it. Some day, when I have a mechanical mixer, I may offer five gallon pails.

Is this putty different than European putty made from marble? As far as I can tell, going by the chemical analysis, my lime is even more pure! I notice the German putty from Kremer is 95% pure, 5% magnesium. Also the modern kilns are highly accurate for slaking and purity. The high calcite lime, other than the potential magnesium problem, also holds water tighter than impure limes. This water retention is what we need for good fresco (and good lime mortar). I would not discourage anyone from making their own putty from quicklime (as long as it is high calcite quicklime), they will soon realize how much hard, dangerous work it was to make putty in the old days, and you would tend to appreciate the material and your artwork much higher. For me, I already have an appreciation, I need to spend my time painting, developing technique, and selling the finished product.

(if you want to purchase aged Italian Lime Putty go here:
http://truefresco.com/frescoshop)

see it on http://www.youtube.com/FrescoSchool Channel:

Making of Practice Lime Putty:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5ZkgcxDqYc


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  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  RE: How to Make Lime Putty Gary sculptari 15-Apr-01 1
     RE: How to Make Lime Putty Iliamoderator 15-Apr-01 2
         RE: How to Make Lime Putty Rebecca (Guest) 16-Apr-01 3
             kremer Iliamoderator 16-Apr-01 4
  RE: How to Make Lime Putty Katherine 31-May-01 5
     RE: How to Make Lime Putty Iliamoderator 30-Sep-01 6
         RE: How to Make Lime Putty Don C. 03-Oct-01 7
             long dissertations Iliamoderator 04-Oct-01 8
                 RE: long dissertations Don C. 05-Oct-01 9
                     RE: long dissertations Myriam Schinazi 11-Oct-01 10
                         RE: long dissertations Iliamoderator 11-Oct-01 11
                             lime pit Iliamoderator 11-Oct-01 12
                             RE: long dissertations Myriam Schinazi 16-Oct-01 13
  Fresco Lime Putty adminadmin 11-Dec-01 14
     RE: Fresco Lime Putty adminadmin 10-Jan-02 15
         RE: Fresco Lime Putty adminadmin 06-Mar-02 18
  RE: How to Make Lime Putty pggay 07-Feb-02 16
     RE: How to Make Lime Putty Arty Clay Forever 30-Mar-04 20
         RE: How to Make Lime Putty Iliamoderator 31-Mar-04 21
             RE: How to Make Lime Putty Arty Clay Forever 31-Mar-04 22
                 RE: How to Make Lime Putty Iliamoderator 31-Mar-04 23
                     RE: How to Make Lime Putty Arty Clay Forever 31-Mar-04 24
                         RE: How to Make Lime Putty Iliamoderator 31-Mar-04 25
                             RE: How to Make Lime Putty Arty Clay Forever 01-Apr-04 26
                                 RE: How to Make Lime Putty adminadmin 01-Apr-04 27
  RE: How to Make Lime Putty cristeto1981 14-Jun-10 28

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Gary sculptari click here to view user rating
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15-Apr-01, 01:45 PM (PST)
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1. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #0
 
   Some corrections!

It is probably best to mix three bags at a time. Any more is hard to handle. The mixer you need is a six inch "Jiffler" not a "Jiffy". The Kremer lime putty has no trace of magnesium, the current price is about $5 (U.S.) per lb. Lime prices are rising right now because of the drastic rise in natural gas prices. If you decided to rent a big mixer, check back with me as to more detailed instructions.


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Iliamoderator
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15-Apr-01, 03:05 PM (PST)
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2. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #1
 
Hi Gary!

Great and very needed post, thank you!
I have tested Kremer lime and my plasterer also worked with it on several projects. This lime may be difficult for the novice. Here is a tip on handling this lime.
Kremer lime needs to be vigorously whisked adding a little of distilled water until it becomes like a sourcream (consistency) a few days before the use, then whisked again before mixing with sand. If this is not done it is very likely for kremer lime to crack.
Now I only use lime from Italy.

Ilia Anossov
http://www.truefresco.com/workshop


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Rebecca (Guest)
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16-Apr-01, 07:25 AM (PST)
 
3. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #2
 
   >I have tested Kremer lime and my plasterer also worked with it on several projects. This lime may be difficult for the novice. >Kremer lime needs to be vigorously whisked adding a little of distilled water until it becomes like a sourcream (consistency) a few days before the use, then whisked again before mixing with sand. If this is not done it is very likely for kremer lime to crack. Now I only use lime from Italy.

Ilia & Gary:

Thanks for this information. The Kremer info is invaluable as I thought I had done something wrong because it does crack often. Gary, you give such wonderful instructions, thank you. Put me first on the list when you begin selling LOL. Good to be back.

Regards,
Rebecca


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Iliamoderator
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16-Apr-01, 07:47 AM (PST)
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4. "kremer"
In response to message #3
 
Hi Rebecca!

I am glad that you found my advice helpful. Can you post what were the uses? Also let me know if my advice on preparing kremer's lime worked for you?

ilia


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Katherine
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31-May-01, 05:01 PM (PST)
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5. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #0
 
   Thank you for the detailed instructions - this site is tremendously helpful. With lime putty mixed in this way, how long will it take before it is suitable for use in fresco? And, (this is a question which i have been curious about for some time, and betrays the fact that I am still new to fresco)why does the lime not set in the bucket or trough?
And is this process the same thing as slaking, or are they different?

Thanks again,

Katherine


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Iliamoderator
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30-Sep-01, 01:03 PM (PST)
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6. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #5
 
LAST EDITED ON 30-Sep-01 AT 01:12 PM (PST)
 
>Thank you for the detailed instructions - this
>site is tremendously helpful. With lime putty
>mixed in this way, how long will it take before
>it is suitable for use in fresco?

Preferably you let it "sit" for a week or two, however you can use it after 48 hours.

And, (this is
>a question which i have been curious about for
>some time, and betrays the fact that I am still
>new to fresco)why does the lime not set in the
>bucket or trough?

It does not set while covered with layer of water in the bucket because a chemical reaction must occur in which calcium carbonate is formed as a result of carbon dioxide from the air combining with the calcium hydrate in the wet lime plaster, slaked or hydrated lime that has been mixed with whater into a paste.

>And is this process the same thing as slaking,
>or are they different?


Gary is talking about Hydrated lime - that is a quick lime that has already been slaked then dried and crushed into powder. You get "second generation" slaked lime when mixing hydrated lime with water into a paste.

Making "first generation" slaked lime or original process of Slaking lime is a different process of mixing QUICK LIME (calcium oxide, CaO) with water. To make slaked lime quick lime must be mixed with water, a lot of energy and heat gets released, so you should be carefull.

Slaked Lime - calcium hydroxide

Slaked lime is white hexagonal solid which dissolved slightly in water.
Formula: Ca(OH)2.


calcium oxide
calcium oxide,
chemical compound, CaO, a colorless, cubic crystalline or white amorphous substance. It is also called lime, quicklime, or caustic lime, but commercial lime often contains impurities, e.g., silica, iron, alumina, and magnesia. It is prepared by heating calcium carbonate (e.g., limestone) in a special lime kiln to about 500°C; to 600°C;, decomposing it into the oxide and carbon dioxide. Calcium oxide is widely used in industry, e.g., in making porcelain and glass; in purifying sugar; in preparing bleaching powder, calcium carbide, and calcium cyanamide; in water softeners; and in mortars and cements. In agriculture it is used for treating acidic soils (liming). It is incandescent when heated to high temperatures; the Drummond light, or limelight, provides a brilliant white light by heating a cylinder of lime with the flame of an oxyhydrogen torch. Calcium oxide is a basic anhydride, reacting with water to form calcium hydroxide; during the reaction (slaking) much heat is given off and the solid nearly doubles its volume.

ilia

http://www.FrescoSchool.com


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Don C.
unregistered user
03-Oct-01, 07:02 AM (PST)
 
7. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #6
 
   Ilia,

I recently picked up a pre-made putty from a local quarry. Their market for the pre-mix is the renovation market. Anyway, the chemist and the GM at the quarry gave me long dissertations which I mostly didn't understand concerning magnesium in limes used for frescos. Basically statement where, using a hydrated lime from the US in the Ohio River Valley for making putties rather then chunk lime negates concerns about magnesium. The lime is geologically much older and the kiln slaking reduces the magesium to a filler\binder and has no adverse chemical reaction to fresco work. Their opinions seemed to be backed up with research on their quarries product. Any opinions? Don C.


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Iliamoderator
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04-Oct-01, 10:41 PM (PST)
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8. "long dissertations"
In response to message #7
 
Hi Don

I have to look at those dissertations, as you call them. Did they give you any printed material or it was all verbal? Can you post them? or email to me?

ilia

http://www.FrescoSchool.com


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Don C.
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05-Oct-01, 05:49 AM (PST)
 
9. "RE: long dissertations"
In response to message #8
 
   Ilia,

I did not get any printed material. It was all verbal. The quarry I was at was the Graymont in Genoa, Ohio. They have a web site and an 800 number. The GM is Mike Tate and the chemist is Ed. I think much of the info they have is from Canada and I believe the Canadian Goverment who studied various limes for historic renovations. Two were approved with theirs being one of the two. They have 45 gallon drums of putty dated June of 99 for $375 plus shipping (US). 3 gallon pails for $55 (US), plus shipping. I have since heard from Nicola Vigini. He uses a pre mixed putty from the same area for his fresco work and says he has never had any problem.

Dissertaion may be a strong descrptor, but when it comes to lime, there are so many processes and techniques of prep and use, some standard, others regional, that I find it sometimes baffeling. I have Millar's book written in the 1890's which has about 150 different ways to prepare and use plasters and this predates modern industrial processes and chemistry of double and triple hydrated limes. Even USG lists on their packaging that different product lines of theirs are not compatable when in fact they work fine together. Myself and others assume that they make these claims because it is easier for them to offer known "product lines" with no reasonable payback on studying compatability.

You obviously have a better grasp and understanding of lime prep and processes. Think you could give Graymont a call and post your impressions??? Thanks, Don C.


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Myriam Schinazi
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11-Oct-01, 06:35 PM (PST)
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10. "RE: long dissertations"
In response to message #9
 
  
I did some research on lime because I was having a hard time understanding the industrial processes by which hydrated lime is manufactured.
Most of the lime products available in the building supply stores are dolomitic and type S. I searched the Graymont web site and asked questions on the lime forum, for more information on dolomitic and types S and N lime.
According to Harry Francis on the lime forum (May 2001), type N hydrated lime (normal) is slaked under regular atmospheric pressure while type S (special) is slaked in autoclave and therefore is more fully hydrated than type N. The process of pressure hydration was developed in the 40’s to solve the problem of hard burnt magnesium lime particles in the firing of dolomitic lime, and to make possible the use of dolomitic lime as a building material. Dolomitic lime is a mixture of calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate. Calcium carbonate needs to be fired ( in the CaO manufacturing process) at higher temperatures than magnesium carbonate causing the magnesium oxide to become hard burnt. Those hard burnt magnesium particles are not easily slaked (hydrated). If not properly slaked they will eventually pop in the mortar (plaster, stucco, etc) weakening the bonds and/or disfiguring of the surface.
Dolomitic lime has not traditionally been used in the past for frescoes and stuccoes. Specialized literature only mentions the use of high calcium lime for these trades. Even though I have no evidence that the type S dolomitic lime would be suitable, I have no indication that it would not be. Therefore industrial type S dolomitic lime may be an avenue worth investigating. Harry Francis writes: “Soft Burned limes generally slake nicely at normal atmospheric pressures, resulting in fat, plastic putty, if the slaking temperatures are kept hot, but below boiling temperatures.” He also writes: “Most hi-calcium limes are now made at very high temperatures, into dry hydrated lime powder, resulting in a very low plastic putty, not suitable for fine finishes” (May 2001).
Because of the high temperatures in the industrial firing of lime, even high-calcium hydrated lime might have to be type S in order to be usable for frescoes and stuccoes. According to Graymont (Genlime, May 2001) a type S, dolomitic lime is best used for mortars while high-calcium lime usually classifies as type N has poor workability and is only suitable for plasters.
The type S Putty sold by Graymont under the name of “Niagara” is not available for retail in my area.
In my local building material store I found Ivory which is a type S sold for gauging plaster. Indeed nobody buys it for frescoes or stuccoes. I am grateful that somebody is buying it for gauging plasters (and mortars?).
I am not sure what the Niaguara lime putty is made of (N or S?) but I suppose that it is a dolomitic lime because that what the Queries are, there in Ohio ( they claim to have the purest best quality dolomitic lime)
they would not consider shipping buckets of lime putty. They do not function that way. They only sell truckloads.
From Missippi lime, with the help of a sale rep I got a bag of high calcium lime (vertical lime, he shipped it to me). When I have the time to work at it I should be able to assess how the high calcium lime fares compared to the type S dolomitic. Phew! Hope you can sort this out!
Myriam


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Iliamoderator
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11-Oct-01, 07:50 PM (PST)
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11. "RE: long dissertations"
In response to message #10
 
LAST EDITED ON 11-Oct-01 AT 07:55 PM (PST)
 
Great post Myriam!

You beat me to ansvering Don's last post.
I have discovered Genlime in 1999, but because of the lime being dolomitic never posted the link to them at TrueFresco.com I did not have time to go around testing it, yet.
Lime putty is also used for restoring ornamental plasters and Niagara by Genlime is designed for this market.
With fresco we look for slightly different criteria - magnesium in dolomitic lime (i wrote about it in some other post) produces flourescent spots and this affects colour, which is not the case for ornamental plasters.
My guess would be that their testing did not include colour testing, at least not to the extend of fine art painting.
I suppose i should give them a call. Myriam can you post whom did you talked to, phone # perhaps?

ilia

http://www.FrescoSchool.com


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Iliamoderator
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12. "lime pit"
In response to message #11
 
I am flying to Terranova Art Found. NY tomorrow and will be talking about possibility of lime pit on their property. It is a long shot - takes over a year, better two to slake, but it is better than ship from Europe. Any resources for high calcium quick lime?

ilia

http://www.FrescoSchool.com


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Myriam Schinazi
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13. "RE: long dissertations"
In response to message #11
 
   Ilia,
Since I did all this talking with Genlime, my computer crashes and I lost all my files
I remember though that I communicated with Mike Tate on email, then I talked to a sales representative and she could not figure out a way for me to have access to the lime putty that I was trying to get at that time.
Mississipi Lime has high calcium lime and you should check with them. I am sure they have quick lime. I will drop more info in your box.
Myriam


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adminadmin click here to view user rating
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14. "Fresco Lime Putty"
In response to message #0
 
Our studio is placing an order fo fresco supplies for our next Fresco Painting Workshop. We would like to offer you an opportunity to add your orders to this shipment.

You can order

http://www.truefresco.com/frescoshoppe

Authentic Fresco Brushes.

"These Unique Fresco brushes made of fine bristle - the only suitable material capable to withstand alkaline action of the lime are being handcrafted in Italy by dedicated craftsmen, following the centuries old tradition and technique.

Fresco Lime Putty

Lime Putty of the highest quality. The only Lime Putty we use in our studio. Lime Putty comes from the same resource (pit) is being used on major fresco restorations in Italy.

Fresco Lime Putty is shipped in air tight buckets and can be stored under the layer of water in the same bucket indefinitely. Also perfect for other types of lime plasters (Venetian stucco, marmorino, etc.)

IMPORTANT!
We need to place the total order on or before December 17th, to have it processed by our associates in Italy before the Holydays. This way it will be shipped to and arrive in the beginning of January.

Please do not delay and place your orders ASAP at

http://www.truefresco.com/frescoshoppe

We accept VISA and MasterCard

if you have questions call (310) 337 2783

learn fresco at http://FrescoSchool.org

fresco painting video tutorials: http://www.FrescoSchool.com

also visit

Fresco School Video Channel
http://youtube.com/FrescoSchool

Contemporary Fresco Gazette
http://trueFresco.Org
commission fresco or mural http://iLAdesigns.com

admin
____________________________
Contemporary Fresco Painting Resouce Center
http://TrueFresco.com


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adminadmin click here to view user rating
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15. "RE: Fresco Lime Putty"
In response to message #14
 
Now accepting Lime Putty orders for delivery in 4-5 weeks!

go to http://www.truefresco.com/frescoshoppe

learn fresco at http://FrescoSchool.org

fresco painting video tutorials: http://www.FrescoSchool.com

also visit

Fresco School Video Channel
http://youtube.com/FrescoSchool

Contemporary Fresco Gazette
http://trueFresco.Org
commission fresco or mural http://iLAdesigns.com

admin
____________________________
Contemporary Fresco Painting Resouce Center
http://TrueFresco.com


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adminadmin click here to view user rating
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18. "RE: Fresco Lime Putty"
In response to message #15
 
Italian Lime Putty IN STOCK! 5-6 days for delivery!

http://www.truefresco.com/frescoshoppe

learn fresco at http://FrescoSchool.org

fresco painting video tutorials: http://www.FrescoSchool.com

also visit

Fresco School Video Channel
http://youtube.com/FrescoSchool

Contemporary Fresco Gazette
http://trueFresco.Org
commission fresco or mural http://iLAdesigns.com

admin
____________________________
Contemporary Fresco Painting Resouce Center
http://TrueFresco.com


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pggay
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07-Feb-02, 12:12 PM (PST)
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16. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #0
 
   Thanks for your great description I've been using Kremer's lime with success but it is expensive and I'd like to make my own. I live an hour south of Albany and don't know where to find the correct bagged lime for making putty. Any suggestions?


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Arty Clay Forever
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30-Mar-04, 06:52 AM (PST)
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20. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #16
 
artyclayforever
HOPE ELIA OR GARY ARE STILL LOOKING IN ON THIS SITE!!!!
HELP!

I bought a product called LIMO and was told that it was "quicklime" ...."hot enought to blow up a bottle"....the olg guy said. However since I wanted to mix it in daylight outdoors...I waited until this morning at eight. Tried it. NO HEAT!!!! Does that mean that it is useless to use for a "lime putty" fresco plaster?
I can't believe I have wasted...well almost wasted three months of my life tracking down the correct lime. This is the third try. Someone out there must still carry the old fashioned white "quicklime" they used
in outdoor toilets.#$%$#@!!!!!


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Iliamoderator
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21. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #20
 
try lime plants, but make sure you will not be buying dolomitic lime

>However since I wanted to mix it in daylight >outdoors...I waited until this morning at eight. >Tried it. NO HEAT!!!!

what did happen? did it give out lots of badly smelling gas?

ilia

http://www.FrescoSchool.com


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Arty Clay Forever
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31-Mar-04, 05:31 PM (PST)
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22. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #21
 
Hi..... the LIMO sample didn't react at all. No smell and NO heat. I was told that because the sample came from an open bag it may have "air" slaked and returned to calcium carb (hope I have that right). My problem was that I started looking for "lime putty" as available here, couldn't find any. Then started looking for "hydrated" lime....what I didn't understand is that there is several kinds of lime/hydrated lime,"N" which is what we need, "S" and a couple of others. Then when the bag I picked up didn't get hot or dry well, cracked bad and it was a buffy colour I started searching for "quicklime" and hit a dead end.
At the moment I found by talking to a few more people that calcium hydrodide works....reacts with the air to seal in the colours. It does not get hot...so it's safer. I was told that "aged quicklime putty" is still the best.

" already hydrated lime in powder form (Ca(OH)2) "
I have a 5 gal bucket being delivered this week.
...and I will report back some time. Getting to be a busy.


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Iliamoderator
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23. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #22
 

>
>" already hydrated lime in powder form (Ca(OH)2)
>"
>I have a 5 gal bucket being delivered this week.
>...and I will report back some time. Getting to
>be a busy.


this should work for you, however be prepared for cracking, detouching, etc. until you will get the right moisture and mixture specific to your area and setup.

there is always a well tested "professional grade" fresco lime putty at:

http://truefresco.com/frescoshoppe

but before you get that try to achieve results with what you have.

ilia

http://www.FrescoSchool.com


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Arty Clay Forever
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31-Mar-04, 05:53 PM (PST)
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24. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #23
 
artyclayforever

NO Ilia....it's NOT available to me, because I live in Canada. I talked to a fellow a couple of weeks ago on the phone and he said they didn't ship to Canada because of the cost of the Customs.
CRACKING eh? Damn......well I planned on following Gary's rule of thumb....of 18 quarts per 50 lb bag broken down to a couple of pounds at a time.

My only other choice is to call Gary's CHEMICAL LIME KILN people in Vancouver and see if they would put a bucket on the bus for me.

Any more good news??????


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Iliamoderator
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31-Mar-04, 06:10 PM (PST)
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25. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #24
 
any lime will crack if put wrongly, it is just cheaper to understand what makes it crack using inexpensive stuff. poor lime putty (made of whatever lime you can get) will give you lesser working time and lesser ways of "finessing" a fresco, but it will only make a difference after you have painted quite a few already...

ilia

http://www.FrescoSchool.com


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Arty Clay Forever
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01-Apr-04, 06:20 PM (PST)
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26. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #25
 
...so I try 1/4 cup variations in the water, weight the lime in a scale like I would a glaze.

If it cracks is that mostly from drying to fast. what if I spritzed it with water as I worked.....not wet....but not drying either...think it would make a difference?

I have been doing a few test pieces on plaster with acrylic colour washes....don't laugh....I thought the feel of the brush on the plaster would be about the same in a general way. ???? What do you think?


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adminadmin click here to view user rating
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27. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #26
 
I would suggest to continue this conversation in it's own topic, please follow to the "Fresco Painting Workshop" forum (link below) and post a new thread

http://www.truefresco.com/cgidir/dcforum/dcboard.cgi?az=list&forum=DCForumID3&conf=DCConfID1

learn fresco at http://FrescoSchool.org

fresco painting video tutorials: http://www.FrescoSchool.com

also visit

Fresco School Video Channel
http://youtube.com/FrescoSchool

Contemporary Fresco Gazette
http://trueFresco.Org
commission fresco or mural http://iLAdesigns.com

admin
____________________________
Contemporary Fresco Painting Resouce Center
http://TrueFresco.com


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cristeto1981
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14-Jun-10, 03:39 AM (PST)
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28. "RE: How to Make Lime Putty"
In response to message #0
 
   WOW. Thanks for that youtube tutorial. It really helps.

http://crosspromotion.wizard4u.com/>joint ventures


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